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Photo of Vernazza from above, Cinque Terre or Amalfi Coast

Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre: Which Sublime Italian Coastline is Best?

Italy

Of all the decisions required when putting together an unforgettable trip to Italy, deciding whether to visit the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre is definitely among the most difficult.

As Italy’s two most famous coastal destinations, Cinque Terre and the Amalfi Coast both offer a chance to visit colorful villages perched along cliffs and admire brilliant azure waters, as well as taste delightful seafood, sip on delicious wines, and even take a few stunning hikes.

Luckily, the Amalfi Coast and Cinque Terre do have their fair share of differences as well, which can help travelers narrow down which coast to visit.

Trying to decide whether to visit the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre? Here’s what to know before you choose.

View of Positano and Positano Beach from above: Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre

Choose the Amalfi Coast if…

… you’re coming from Rome or Naples.

If you’re hoping to visit the Amalfi Coast as part of a larger trip to Italy, Naples and Rome are the most geographically convenient major cities to add to your itinerary.

Staircase with a wall of magnets in Amalfi

… you want to take a road trip.

Driving on the Amalfi Coast has a reputation for being a bit difficult–and true, we wouldn’t recommend it to someone not comfortable traveling on very narrow roads with very large buses for company–but the road itself is undeniably beautiful, and if you’re hoping to explore the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre independently by car, the Amalfi Coast is the destination for you.

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… you want easy access to nearby day trips.

Capri, Ischia, Pompeii, Naples, Sorrento–Campania is chock full of incredible Italian destinations other than the Amalfi Coast, and they’re all fairly reasonable to get to!

If you’re hoping to choose one base and visit several spots in the greater region as day trips during your coastal getaway, head directly to the Amalfi Coast.

… you’re looking for warm weather in the shoulder season.

As the Amalfi Coast is located significantly further south than Cinque Terre, if you’re traveling in the shoulder season and hoping to luck out with warm weather, the Amalfi Coast is the safer bet.

Sailboat in a small harbor near the Amalfi Coast, Italy

Choose Cinque Terre if…

… you’re coming from Florence or Milan.

Located in the Liguria region, Cinque Terre is better reached from Florence or Milan than tourist hotspots further south like Rome or further east like Venice.

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… you prefer a more casual atmosphere.

While you don’t need to splurge on a luxury hotel and dress to the nines to visit the Amalfi Coast–we certainly didn’t–in general, Cinque Terre has a much more casual, down-to-earth atmosphere as compared to the glitz of the Amalfi Coast.

If you’re looking for something that feels a little less “luxury resort” and a little more “Italian fishing village”, Cinque Terre is the place for you (emphasis on a little, however–whether you visit Cinque Terre or the Amalfi Coast, you’re going to be visiting a very touristy place).

Riomaggiore at sunset from viewpoint above the town, Cinque Terre

… you don’t want to drive.

Not only do you not have to rent a car or drive to visit Cinque Terre, you absolutely should not!

The villages of Cinque Terre are best explored via a combination of hiking and the incredibly efficient train system that runs between all five villages–absolutely no driving required.

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… you only have a couple of days to spare.

Cinque Terre is much smaller than the Amalfi Coast, and it’s much easier to tour the (tiny) villages quickly on this coast.

For example, while it can take an hour to travel between the towns of Positano and Amalfi, it only takes a mere 15 minutes via train to travel between the two villages in Cinque Terre that are furthest apart (Riomaggiore and Monterosso al Mare).

View of Vernazza harbor from above, Cinque Terre

Choose either the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre for…

… incredible hiking.

Whether you’re tracing the Path of the Gods on the Amalfi Coast or marveling at the views between the villages of Cinque Terre, hikers will be thrilled with the natural landscapes offered on these stunning coasts.

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… magnificent natural landscapes.

In sheer natural beauty, the Amalfi Coast may have the tiniest edge over Cinque Terre–but really, they’re both ridiculously gorgeous and worthy of the trip.

Cliffs of Capri, Italy, with sea below

… delicious seafood (and food in general).

Of course, no region in Italy is a slouch when it comes to food, but the seafood dishes you can find in Cinque Terre and the Amalfi Coast are absolutely sublime!

If you visit Cinque Terre, be sure to also try the local pesto (one of my favorite foods in the world!), and no visit to the Amalfi Coast could be complete without a sampling of all the delightful dishes created with local lemons (limoncello, of course, being the most famous).

Basket of lemons for sale in Amalfi Town on the Amalfi Coast

… mediocre beaches.

While you can absolutely have a relaxing beach day when visiting either the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre, don’t come here expecting powder-white sand and beaches that stretch on for ages.

Both destinations do have beaches to enjoy, but these are a bonus, not a huge selling point, and they won’t be able to compete with beach destinations in, say, Greece.

Come to either Cinque Terre or the Amalfi Coast for the food, the views, the beautiful villages, the atmosphere, the boat rides–not the beaches.

Rocky Beach in Capri, Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre

Should I visit both Cinque Terre and the Amalfi Coast?

Over the course of a lifetime? Absolutely!

In a single Italy trip, though? Unless you have an unusually long trip to Italy planned–say 3 weeks or longer–and you’re extremely interested in squeezing both spots into your trip, I’d say probably not.

While both the Amalfi Coast and Cinque Terre are stunningly beautiful, they’re also both a bit of a pain to get to, both from each other and from other major tourism hubs in Italy.

With so many incredibly diverse and exciting things to do on any given trip to Italy, I’d recommend picking one of these coasts to feature in your trip, and to save the other for a future trip.

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Final Call: Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre?

Still having trouble choosing whether to visit the Amalfi Coast or Cinque Terre? Let geography by your guide!

Whichever destination is easier to reach given the rest of your Italy itinerary, opt for that one, and you almost certainly won’t have any regrets.

Personally, we prefer Cinque Terre slightly over the Amalfi Coast, but it entirely depends on what you are looking for–and plenty of people will disagree with us!


Amalfi Coast vs. Cinque Terre text on image for Pinterest. Photo of Vernazza on top and Positano below.

4 Comments Write a comment

Kate has been traveling the world full-time for more than 3 years. She tries to keep a balance between going on new adventures and exploring favorite destinations (like Italy!) in depth, and is always on the lookout for the next beautiful overlook and delicious meal.

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4 Comments

  • MIchelle Patterson June 19, 2019

    Hi Kate,

    My hubby and I want to travel to Rome, Venice, Florence/Tuscany
    and CInque terre. We live in South Florida. Can you tell me what order
    you would do each place. Fly into where and go in what order to each place
    I mentioned. We have 14 days to use. I need itnerry. WHere to I start and end?

    • Kate Storm June 20, 2019

      Hi Michelle!

      We actually have a 2 week itinerary for Italy that covers these exact locations and gives our suggested order (Rome, Florence/Tuscany, Cinque Terre, Venice, in that order)–however, that is flexible! Here’s the itinerary: https://www.ourescapeclause.com/2-weeks-in-italy-itinerary/

      Coming all the way from South Florida, I’d check ticket prices to both Rome and Venice, plus maybe even Milan if you don’t mind an extra train ride upon arriving in Italy, and see if one city is significantly cheaper than the other to fly into, which is sometimes the case. If there’s no major difference, I’d fly into Rome and start there.

  • Steven Mock July 10, 2019

    Hi Kate, I am currently planning a trip to Italy for next spring (Mid May) and although I really want to visit both the Amalfi Coast and Cinque Terre, it sounds like you don’t think that is a good idea. My current rough itinerary looks like this: 3 nights Rome, 3 nights Sorrento (day trips to Amalfi and/or Capri), 4 nights at a farmhouse in Tuscany (day trips to Florence and Tuscany touring, 2 nights in La Spezia (day trips into Cinque Terre) and 3 nights in Venice. I have been reading articles (including yours) that indicate that maybe I might be better off removing Cinque Terre from the itinerary, perhaps adding another night in Sorrento and Tuscany instead, making for a more relaxing trip. I have been reading about Ischia and Procida that sound interesting and also that Cinque Terre is so crowded that the towns are actually trying to reduce tourism. I should add that I will be 58 and my fie 60 when we take this tour. My big worry is that this will be the trip of our lifetime and we may never be back to Italy, which is why my itinerary is fairly aggressive. Do you have any thoughts that might help me?

    • Kate Storm July 11, 2019

      Hi Steven!

      Ultimately the choice is up to you: if you really want to see both and think you might not go back to Italy, you should! I’ve done far more impractical things on a time crunch when traveling. But if you think you could be good with one or the other, ideally, I wouldn’t visit both places with around 2 weeks in Italy.

      Personally, I’d definitely recommend your second plan–that will give you more time both around the Amalfi Coast area and Tuscany. Ischia and Procida are great options for the extra day near the Amalfi Coast, as is some combo of Pompeii/Vesuvius/Herculaneum if the history appeals to you. You can never have too much time in Tuscany–the list of possible things to see and do is a mile long.

      One trip is never enough to see it all, and any combo of the destinations you mentioned is worthy of being called the trip of a lifetime. So there’s no wrong answer, and no pressure. 🙂

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